Alfred Matthew Churley (Cawthorne)

Alfred Matthew Churley (Cawthorne)

Male 1870 - 1957  (87 years)

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  • Name Alfred Matthew Churley (Cawthorne) 
    Born 26 Feb 1870  Hawthorne Cottage, Wells Rd, Sydenham, Kent Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    _UID 2EDC44AC0B8CB74E9981F072211214ED469C 
    Died 11 Nov 1957  Folkestone, Kent Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I11  cawthorne
    Last Modified 22 Jan 2017 

    Father Albert William Ballyman Churly,   b. 1830, Cullompton, Devonshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1910  (Age 80 years) 
    Mother Jane Emily Cawthorn,   b. 17 Jan 1835, Clerkenwell, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1923, Uffculme, Fox Hill, Upper Norwood, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Married 11 Aug 1859  St. George, Camberwell, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 8E2037A4D88A534BB873AD021B8D7F40CA53 
    Family ID F5  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Annie Francis Woods,   b. 29 Apr 1866, Near Colchester Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Feb 1943, Eastbourne Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 15 Sep 1892  Preston Parish Church, Brighton,Sussex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID ECD203BF1742964B94C1F6B8220CAEC25B61 
    Children 
     1. Sylvia Maud Cawthorne,   b. About 1893,   d. About 1893  (Age ~ 0 years)
     2. Dr. Kathleen Frances Cawthorne,   b. 11 Jun 1895, Woodside, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jun 1987, Mijas, Malaga, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)
     3. Alfred Stuart Blomfield Cawthorne,   b. 29 May 1897, Contamine, Uxbridge Rd, Ealing Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Oct 1955, Westminster Hospital, Westminster Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     4. Muriel (Margaret) Marguerite Cawthorne,   b. 3 Jun 1899, Upper Norwood, Croydon, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jun 1993, Folkestone, Kent Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)
     5. Leighton Hargrave Cawthorne,   b. 4 Oct 1901, Contamine, Uxbridge Rd, Ealing Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Feb 1977, Northiam, East Sussex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     6. Clement Bowlby Cawthorne,   b. 18 Oct 1906, Uxbridge Road, Ealing, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1995, Gatwick Park Hospital, Sussex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
     7. Gwendolen Ethel Cawthorne,   b. 15 Dec 1911, Contamine, 79 Uxbridge Road, Ealing Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Nov 2006, Bracknell House, 34 Helena Rd, Capel-le-Ferne, Kent Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)
    Last Modified 29 Dec 2016 
    Family ID F4  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Gladys Audrey May Cole,   b. 21 Feb 1893, South Molton, Devon Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Q2 1980, Shepway, Kent Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Married Q1 1950 
    _UID 29C2BD3D15CA35449255121CA414C7D2A384 
    Last Modified 14 Dec 2016 
    Family ID F162  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne née Churley
    Alfred Mathew Cawthorne née Churley
    Alfred Matthew Churley (later Cawthorne)
    Alfred M Churly (later Cawthorne)
    Alfred M Cawthorne & family ca 1907
    Alfred M Churly & family ca 1907
    Alfred, Stuart, Leighton, Marguerite, Kathleen, Clement, Annie, ~~
    Alfred M Churly & Family ca 1916
    Alfred M Churly & Family ca 1916
    Back: Stuart, Alfred, Leighton~~Front: Marguerite, Clement, Gwen, Annie, Kathleen
    Alfred Matthew Churley (later Cawthorne)
    Alfred Matthew Churley (later Cawthorne)
    This is surely Clement Cawthorne in about 1911 (and not Alfred M Churley!)
    Alfred Matthew Churley (later Cawthorne)
    Alfred Matthew Churley (later Cawthorne)
    This is surely Clement Cawthorne in about 1911 (and not Alfred M Churley!)
    Little Wold, Warlingham
    Little Wold, Warlingham
    Little Wold, Warlingham
    Little Wold, Warlingham
    Little Wold, Warlingham
    Little Wold, Warlingham
    Cawthornes skiing in Adelboden Switzerland in about 1924 : Annie, Alfred, Leighton and Muriel.
    Cawthornes skiing in Adelboden Switzerland in about 1924 : Annie, Alfred, Leighton and Muriel.
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Lamberhurst Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Lamberhust Manor
    Lamberhust Manor
    Tunbridge Wells
    Alfred and Annie Cawthorne
    Alfred and Annie Cawthorne
    Tropical Holiday
    [But when and where?]
    Alfred M Cawthorne and Family 1914
    Alfred M Cawthorne and Family 1914
    From Clement's notes :
    Back row : Aunt Edie, AMC, Muriel, Stuart
    Front : Annie Frances with Gwen, Rose Sweet, Nurse, Aunt Emmie
    with Leighton on the ground.
    Rose Sweet is a Cousin of Alfred W B Churley.
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Clement suggests this might be an Engagement Photo in which case it would be in 1891. There is a similar Portrait photo of Annie Frances Woods at around this time too. However AMC Looks somewhat younger here (18 or 19?) than he does in his wedding photo in 1891 when he was 22.
    Albert, George and Alfred Churley
    Albert, George and Alfred Churley
    Three Churley Brothers : Albert William Churley (1861-1881) - top left , George James Churley (1869-1929) - top right and Alfred Matthew Churley (later Cawthorne) (1870-1957) - front.
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne and Annie Frances Woods
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne and Annie Frances Woods
    Wedding 15 Sep 1892

    Documents
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Birth Certificate : 26 Feb 1870
    Hawthorne Cottage, Wells Road, Sydenham
    Father : Albert Churly, Pianoforte Tuner
    Mother : Emily Jane Churly
    Registered : 6 Apr 1870
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Death Certificate
    Died 11 Nov 1957 aged 88 at 26 Grimstone Gardens, Folkestone, Kent
    Home address : 207c Sandygate Road, Folkestone
    Registered 13 Nov 1957 by Gladys A M Cawthorne ("Audrey")
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne and Annie Frances Woods
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne and Annie Frances Woods
    Marriage Certificate
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Change of Name from Churley to Cawthorne by Deed Poll.
    Announcement in Lewisham Gazette 5 Jun 1891.
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Alfred Matthew Cawthorne
    Deed Poll for Change of surname from Churley to Cawthorne 13 May 1891 and enrolled in the Central Office of the Supreme Court on 3 June 1891.

  • Notes 
    • Changed name by Deed Poll on 30th May 1891

      ALFRED MATTHEW CHURLEY (CAWTHORNE)

      CHANGE OF NAME FROM CHURLEY TO CAWTHORNE IN 1891

      There is no clear evidence of the reason why GEORGE and ALFRED CAWTHORNE changed their names from CHURLEY - their father's surname - to CAWTHORNE, their mother's maiden name. The explanations given by George, Alfred and their sisters, Emmie and Edie, have not been consistent, but were as follows:-
      (1) GEORGE, when applying for a transfer of the family coat of arms, stated "this change is at the request of my Uncle George in order to ensure the continuation of the name of Cawthorne". Incidentally, the permission to change the coat of arms was actually signed by Queen Victoria.
      (2) ALFRED, the writer's father, was evasive and somewhat cross when asked by his grandson why the change of name took place, and said something to the effect that his mother would not accept any of her brother's fortunes made in Mauritius using slave labour, but his brother George had hoped to inherit the fortune.
      However, on another occasion, he gave his daughter-in-law, Phyllis, a picture of the local boys jeering and calling him and his brother George rude names because of what had become public knowledge in their locality and he further explained that there was no need for his sisters to change their names as the change would come naturally in marriage. At no time did he mention that the change was at the request of his Uncle George in Mauritius and it is highly possible that he did not know of the document applying for the transfer of the Churley coat of arms to the name Cawthorne.
      (3) EDITH, over three years younger than Emmie and who was 13 when her brother 'Bertie' died, has suggested that her uncle James was reputed to have produced two illegitimate girls and two illegitimate boys, but this must have happened 15 to 20 years previous to the change of name. She also mentioned William, the Apple Boy, buried under the tree at Hawthorne Cottage.
      (4) EMMIE seems to have kept quiet and, being the eldest surviving member of her generation, is the one who must have known the real reason if it were different from that given by George in his Deed Poll.George in his Deed Poll. However, it was from her that we learnt about her and Edie attending Davenants at Sibble Heddingham.
      It is unusual, to say the least, that no reference was made by his son Emile to his second wife that his grandfather was a Churley, and even more surprising that, when after his death, his widow Elaine, who lived for years with Emmie, always assumed that her mother-in-law was a Cawthorne. However, Elaine now says that she always felt that there was a mystery behind the death of Emmie's brother Albert at 19 years old. This must surely show that Emmie was keeping a part of her family history from her second daughter-in-law, and in fact misleading her just as her son had done.
      Some facts are:-
      (i) As far as is known, neither Alfred Cawthorne, the sugar planter, nor George Cawthorne, the constructional engineer in Mauritius, left any money to their sister's family or to their sister, Jane Churley. It is understood that George married, but it is not known if he had any children. He died in Port Louis prior to 1892.
      (ii) When George Churley was about 14 and Alfred about 11, they were at a boarding establishment, CROYLE HOUSE SCHOOL, situated on the parish boundaries of Kentisbeare and Uffculme, Devon, probably owned by a family connection, a Mr. Radford, and their two sisters were sent away to a boarding school in Sible Heddingham, Suffolk. This exodus of the children would have been about 1881 or 1882, shortly after the death of their eldest brother, Albert, on 27th April 1881.
      (iii) Although George could have changed his name following his 21st birthday on 26th December 1889, he did not do so until April 1891.
      (iv) Alfred changed his name at the same time, 30th May 1891, which for practical purposes was the earliest date possible, as he became of age on 26th February 1891. He gave his address as Hawthorne Cottage, where he was living with his parents.
      The solicitor seems to have been one Oliver Minster, practising in Coventry. Did he also act for George in the change of name? Was he the solicitor for whom George was a solicitor's clerk? And was he also Mrs. Gough's solicitor?
      (v) The circumstances of Albert's death in 1881 given on his death certificate and registered by his 16 year old sister (not mother or father) are unusual, to say the least (see copy of certificate).
      The writer's interpretation is that, even though the trouble had been incurred some 7 to 10 years earlier, George, in view of his forthcoming marriage to a wealthy widow, wished the trouble of the past not to be given publicity at the time of his marriage, which could have happened if he had still been called George Churley. The name George Cawthorne would not bring to mind any recollection of the past, and what more natural than to give as a reason, the perpetuation of the name Cawthorne at the request of his uncle George Cawthorne, who was a prominent man in Mauritius and which was his mother's maiden name.
      As the nature of the trouble about which Alfred said the local boys jeered can only be a matter of conjecture, I do not propose to set down what I think it was, except that I feel that an examination of the certificate of the death of Albert William in 1881 gives an indication of the possible reason, and perhaps also the story of William, the Apple Boy, could throw some light on it. However, if there had been bad publicity in the district affecting the family, it could not have been too bad, as Albert and Jane Churley and their unmarried daughter, Edie, continued to live at Hawthorne Cottage, or within three or four miles of it, for the rest of their joint lives - about 30 years.
      A search of the two weekly newspapers which circulated in the area was made, covering the period just prior to and for 2 or 3 weeks after Albert's death on 27th April 1881, and no mention of his death was found.
      The Lewisham and West Kent newspaper was read from 1st January to mid-May 1881 and the Sydenham and Forrest Hill News for the weeks in April and May 1881.
      Notes by Michael Cawthorne made about 1980.

      AMC told me a story of his articled clerkship to a firm called F.B. SMART, where he was trusted to do a lot of good work, but not appreciated, and sometimes belittled. One day, in front of clients, he was unfairly belittled and insulted. This he would not take from any man, so he said so and on being beaten threw his boss out of the office into a canal.
      His father was very angry and told him to go and make his own way in life. He had done all he would ever do for such a son. He could go with £100 and he would never speak to him again. With the £100 AMC had worked hard and made all that could be now seen of his property and wealth !
      I think this was told to me when I was an articled clerk in 1953
      NOTE: AMC was 83 in 1953. His father used to visit him regularly prior to 1914 War. CBC.
      In February of 1949, before I took my examinations at King's School, Godfather ALFRED CAWTHORNE showed me a magazine COUNTRY LIFE dated 1910 (or 1911) in which there was an article about a family "Castleton" or similar in which JAMES CHURLEY was mentioned. I do not remember reading the article properly, but I was impressed with the seriousness in which AMC explained that I was old enough to know of the "Skeleton in the Cupboard" (He kept the magazine in the safe). He told me not to talk about it as it was a secret and some people would be hurt to know of it; but he wanted me to know.
      "He had a wicked Uncle Jim - James Churley, who had had an affair with a Dairymaid, whom he had killed, and later lived with another woman whose family had had him sent abroad." The family had been terribly ashamed, and so never talked about this.
      NOTE: He certainly had a naughty Uncle James, as described, who married in 1862 - 27 years before the change of name CBC

      ALFRED MATTHEW CHURLEY (CAWTHORNE)

      ALFRED was born 26th February 1870 - the year that the Germans entered Paris for the first time, the second time being 70 years later - at HAWTHORNS COTTAGE, Wells Road, Sydenham. He told us that he was sent to a school near Kentisbeare called CROYLE HOUSE SCHOOL owned by Mr. Radford, a relation, and later to another relation in Norfolk. It is reasonable to surmise that he was sent away to school at the time of his eldest brother's death, when he would have just become 11 years old. His sisters, EMILY and EDIE, were no doubt at this time sent to Davenants, a private school at Sible Heddingham, Essex.
      (It is curious that about 50 years later, in 1929, Clement (CBC) used to visit Davenants where his wife to be, Phyllis Popplewell, would be staying, the property being; owned by Mr. Dudley Payne, her brother Peter's father-in-law).
      In spite of what may have been indifferent schooling, Alfred had a thirst to learn and, obtaining a job in about 1891 with F.B. Smart and Sons, Accountants, he very soon found himself in charge of about 30 bankruptcies and liquidations. At about this time, 15th September 1892, he married ANNIE FRANCIS WOODS, much to the disapproval of the Woods family. Annie was three years his senior. (born 29th April 1866).
      Alfred, in about 1895, started in business with a partner in Queen Street as tea importers and merchants, and they were the first people to sell tea in packets - it had previously been sold loose. His partner let him down - he did not repay the sum of £400 that Alfred had lent him. Alfred had to sell all his possessions and he and his wife were left with no furniture but a bed. Annie was sent with the babies to stay with her parents for about two years, whilst Alfred slept in the office - the rent had fortunately been paid in advance.
      However, shortly afterwards he had recovered his position sufficiently to hold a "wow of a party" for the Lord Mayor's Show and to buy CASTLEDENE. Later he acquired his first Benz (in 1898 or 1899), - the second to be imported into the U.K. - and later a White Steamer, which was a steam driven carriage with tiller steering. This would be about 1898 - 1899
      Early in the new century he was studying building construction and architecture and taking a keen interest in property development. He moved from Queen Street to 121 Victoria Street and, with a Mr. Lovatt, practised as an architect, and in 1904 purchased land in WOLDINGHAM. (The Polo Field in Lunghurst Road) and obtained options to purchase further land from the London Union Land Co.
      The first house occupied in Woldingham was "GRANGEHURST" and having built SYLVAN MOUNT for himself in 1906, he built many more country houses for sale in Woldingham. When war broke out, he had eleven houses on his hands unsold and many of them are shown in a brochure still in existence
      Although he was never a true gardener, he excelled in landscape work - specialising in terrace building. He appeared to have a violent temper and to his workmen he was known as "hell fire Dick" and was very often on the building sites at 6.30 or 7.00 a.m., before the men arrived.
      His early financial training and a natural inclination for figures enabled him to carry out large developments with the minimum of capital and the maximum of loans.
      When things were bad, Annie would see that he wore an immaculate frock coat with a flower in button hole, and probably encouraged him to hunt on two days a week. No doubt she was very much responsible for his success during the first 25 years of married life.
      The outbreak of the Great War, when he was 44, virtually smashed Alfred financially. He served on various war committees and on the War Agricultural Committee, which meant his travelling around the country. To earn some money he would buy a car, say in Liverpool when on an official visit, and drive it back to London and sell it. He , was forced to remove Leighton from Blundells because he could not find the fees and sent him and Clement to a day school at Hastings (University College School).
      After the Great War, people with money could no longer afford to maintain large country mansions, but there was a demand for country houses with say eight bedrooms, inclusive of staff bedrooms. at least two or three bathrooms and perhaps three to four living rooms, with modern domestic quarters. Alfred had a gift for visualizing the way to alter the large mansions to modern conditions, and throughout the period 1920 to about 1939 he specialised in such work, either accepting commissions from clients or buying the properties and having the remodelling carried out by a company called North Downs Building Co. Ltd., which he controlled. There are examples throughout the southern counties, such as WONHAM MANOR near Reigate, where he took away the upper storey, and LAMBERHURST MANOR, where he did away with the ground floor, which had been at lake level, and converted the first floor and second floor into a magnificent house. Asking £22,500 when the war was imminent, he sold it for £18,000 and a few years later the Marquess of Camden paid £50,000 for the place, which was a considerable amount of money in those days. There are good examples of new houses designed by him at Upper Cheyne Row, Chelsea and Ennismore Gardens, Knightsbridge.
      Not only were estates modernised for clients or for reselling, but he could not resist making beautiful homes for his family, and after a few years, when little more could be done, he would become restless and want to move. Then, between the wars, we lived at IVERWOOD, WEYBRIDGE, for about eighteen months, moving subsequently. The album of photos shoes the remodelled house (the outside was not to his liking) and especially shows the typical terrace work and landscaping and his glazed doors, which were rare in 1923.
      To run Burntwood he employed a head gardener, an under-gardener and a cowman/handyman, also a chauffeur. The indoor staff consisted of a butler, housekeeper, house-parlour maid, cook and kitchen maid. By-1939 he had remodelled and lived in a further five large homes with land varying from 3 to 65 acres.
      During all these years there were expensive cars - usually one Rolls Royce, Minerva or other large car, and one other at least. There were also sports holidays for the family and cruises. He spent well and always felt that his spending produced the wealthy clients and their business.
      The outbreak of the World War in 1939 put an end to his architectural practice which he had been carrying on from 35 Walpole Street, Chelsea in partnership with his son, LEIGHTON. As there was a moratorium for mortgages and loans, he was able to maintain his capital intact, but when war ended in 1945 he was 75, and virtually retired.
      Just before the outbreak of war in 1939, Alfred and Annie moved to ROBIN HILL, a house in Eastbourne, which he had completely modernised and had installed a lift for Annie, who at times had severe rheumatism. The alterations to Robin Hill were the last carried out and amongst the family photographs will be found pictures showing the house before alteration and after. This is an example of his rare gift of being able to visualise how an ugly old house would look after he had replanned it. In addition to his ability to replan the old house, he had the detailed technical knowledge of building construction to enable him to have the major alterations carried out.
      Annie died on 17th April 1943 and on 18th January 1950 Alfred married a very sweet spinster, GLADYS AUDREY MAY COLE, aged 55, who looked after him until he died in 1957, aged 87.
      During the last ten years of his life, Alfred arranged his affairs so that on his death his estate was proved at only £40,000, leaving his sons, Leighton and Clement to bring to fruition his plans for his Chelsea Estate, in which he first took a financial interest in 1923.
      Before the first Great War, Alfred's hobbies were cars, hunting and skiing, at Mürren (1912). After the First War, he had little time for hobbies, although he kept up his skiing for many years. On a long climb he liked to arrive first and maintain that he was "not a bit tired".
      Although Alfred had the outward appearance of being a stern man, he was really very kind and thoughtful of others. He never failed to write helpful letters - without delay - and always turned up when any member of his family was ill. He was particularly helpful to his sisters, Edie and Emmie, and Bessie his sister-in-law, who had been left widows for many years, and either looked them up or wrote almost every week.
    • 1871 Census :
      Albert B Churley Head 40 Pianoforte Tuner
      Emily Churley Wife 35
      Emily E J Daughter 6
      Edith E Daughter 3
      George J Son 2
      Alfred M Son 1
      Mary Cawthorne Mother 71
      Emma Evans ??? 13
      all lived at Hawthorne Cottage, Sydenham, Kent.
      Note : Churley appears to be spelt with an E, whereas in the 1861 Census it was without an E.
    • 1901 Census :
      Alfred Cawthorne Head 31 Surveyor
      Annie F Cawthorne Wife 29
      Kathleen F Daughter 5
      Stuart Son 3
      Muriel Daughter 2
      Nellie Hill Servant 25
      Ballyman Churley Visitor 66 Living on own means
      Janet Churley Visitor 58 Living on own means
    • Passenger List :
      Alfred Matthew Cawthorne 59 Architect
      Annie Francis Cawthorne 57
      Gwendolen Cawthorne 17
      were passengers From Genoa to Southampton on the Prinses Juliana arriving on 13 July 1929. The address given was Littlewold, Warlingham, Surrey.
    • 1892 Wedding registered in Steyning under both names : Alfred Matthew CHURLEY and Alfred Matthew CAWTHORNE.